Rehab Treatment Center, Assisted Recovery Midwest, Offers Drug, Vivtrol, to Stop Alcohol Cravings


 

Rehab Treatment Center, Assisted Recovery Midwest, Offers Drug, Vivtrol, to Stop Alcohol Cravings – If there was medication to keep habitual drunk drivers off the road, would you want our courts to include the therapy in a sentence? The Assisted Recovery Centers of America located on Chippewa Avenue in South St. Louis does. It’s where alcoholics and drug abusers go for monthly injections of Vivitrol coupled with counseling. Jamie Wienstroer had his share of DWI’s. He consumed a case of beer a day with vodka. Once he even blacked out, fell from a bridge and was hit by a metro-link train which caused him to suffer frontal lobe damage. But with this treatment, he hasn’t had a drink in ten months. Nothing prior to Vivitrol, not even Alcoholics Anonymous worked in the past. Clayton attorney Travis Noble Jr. is a former police officer who busted countless drunk drivers. He’s now a supporter of Vivitrol and the treatment alcoholics and drug abusers get at ARCA. He’s trying to get more courts and Mother’s Against Drunk Drivers to climb on board. He says harsh jail sentences are not enough. When someone gets out, they just start drinking again. Vivitrol along with psychiatric care blocks the high that triggers alcoholics to keep drinking. Assisted Recovery Centers of America is located at 6651 Chippewa and they can be reached at 314-646-6840. Visit www.arcamidwest.com for more information. From: ST. LOUIS, MO (FOX2now.com) South St. Louis Treatment Center Offers Drug to Combat Offers Drug to Stop Alcohol Cravings By John Pertzborn April 27, 2009

 

State Moves to Close HB Detox Center Where OC Man Died
By definition, residential drug or alcohol detoxification treatment centers are nonmedical in nature, wrote an attorney for the Department of Alcohol and Drug Programs, Millicent Tidwell, in making the state's case. In a legal document, Tidwell … Read more on Patch.com

Intoxicated ER patients see fewer potentially fatal problems
Although drinking too much alcohol impairs judgment and motor skills, intoxicated trauma-center patients also appear to be less likely to have potentially fatal problems such as heart and renal failure, a statistical study by a University of Illinois … Read more on Chicago Tribune


Tags: , , , , ,